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The Absence of Nature

The printing, upholstering and final result of ‘The Absence of Nature’ chairs.  The blue chair, entitled Chair (The Presence of Nature) Or, ‘Life’ is upholstered in a six-colour screenprinted fabric.  The white chair, entitled Chair (The Absence of Nature) Or, ‘this should be an empty space on a plinth, though the plinth wouldn’t exist without nature either…’ is upholstered in a single colour screenprinted fabric.

The piece is meant to highlight the beauty, detail and intricacy of nature against the bland, colourless state of the alternative, exploring biodiversity and the loss of nature.

The fabric was developed during my AA2A residency at UCLan in Preston.

Gallery Oldham Residency

paper-flower-test-header

Next month, I’ll be completing a residency at Gallery Oldham and creating work in response to one of their upcoming exhibitions ‘Art Forms in Nature’ which opens in mid-October.   The exhibition, touring from the Hayward Gallery, features work by Karl Blossfeldt and I am using his images as inspiration for an installation of weird and wonderful plants made out of paper.

For the second part of the residency, I will be offering drop-in workshops to add to the installation – making oversize blooms out of paper, using lots of different techniques such as origami, paper cutting and folding.

The event and workshops, called Nightshade, are also part of the Manchester Science Festival – there’s lots of different things to see and do during the ten day event – have a look at the programme here.

I’ve been doing some test pieces for the installation, concentrating on creating poisonous, carnivorous and parasitic plant forms.

 

Animating Lordship Lane

I’ve just finished a commission for arts event ‘Animating Lordship Lane’ in East Dulwich, London organised by Fantasy High Street.  ‘Mille Fleurs’ was a curtain of suspended paper flowers, for the window of a fragrance shop called Roullier White, which moved and rotated in the breeze to create interest and animation in the window.  I also ran a paper flower making workshop during the event, whereby we made tissue paper flowers, origami flowers and origami butterflies.

Most of the flowers for the ‘Mille Fleurs’ commission were created from thick watercolour paper, stamped and laser cut into various shapes and then hand rolled to create the curve of petals.  Other flowers were created from floristry crepe paper (a much thicker crepe paper than normal) which allows for a lot of stretch and shaping to create delicate petals and flowers.

Thanks to Miriam from Roullier White for the fantastic photos!

It’s all Bentley’s fault…

Infes-PANO

Following last year’s project for Bentley Library where I worked with local groups to create a community library chair, I’ve been itching to have a go at making/upholstering another one. So, for a recent exhibition at Hot Bed Press, I decided to create some screenprinted textiles for a new piece of work in the shape of a Parker Knoll armchair.

‘Infestation’ is upholstered in silk, hand screenprinted with hundreds of beetles which appear to be crawling out of the chair.  Each piece of material features an individual design created from my drawings of beetles.  There are about 100 different species of beetle in the surface design from the Javan Fiddle Beetle (Mormolyce phyllodes) to, my favourite, the Long-Necked Shining Fungus Beetle (Datelium wallacei) – you can’t beat that for a name.  The chair also has it’s very own beetle legs, brilliantly made by Arbarus.

Infest-2

The work is part of an ongoing series in which I’ll be exploring chairs and similar products, questioning their form and usability (does a chair have to be functional to be a chair?) and reimagining the original design and finish to manipulate reaction and perception.

To create this installation piece I firstly used Photoshop to generate full-size artwork from scans of my beetle drawings, which I then turned into screenprints.  I created individual screens for both the fill colour and the key layer (the final line).  I’d pre-cut and labelled the individual pieces of silk for the upholstery so I could control which part of the pattern was on each part of the chair.  Once the fabric was printed, I set about upholstering!

Leaf Prints at The Lowry Hotel

Silver-Birch-detail

I’m currently showing some of my leaf prints in a lovely exhibition called Inky Fingers at The Lowry Hotel.  Produced by Comme Ca Art and curated by Andrew Magee, the exhibition showcases the work of six printmakers from Hot Bed Press including myself and Andrew, Jez Dolan, Samuel Horsley, Gwilym Hughes and Robert Helnow.

The exhibition runs until 17th November so two more weeks to go and have a look!

Deutzia-Rosea

Silver-Birch Hazel

 

Drawing for screenprinting

US-070415-01It seems like I’ve been permanently sat at my drawing board for the last month trying to get lots of drawings done for some new screen prints.  These are to add to the highly detailed urban series I started in 2014 but this time I’ve created more of the large-scale drawings rather than just the small pieces.  They’re approximately 500mm wide with variable heights.

I’m really pleased with them but being bigger means that they take MUCH longer to draw – and the pressure is on not to get anything too wrong!  Ho hum – I’m working my way through the Desert Island Discs back catalogue and have listened to Grayson Perry’s Reith Lectures again (which are just brilliant – I wish I was that eloquent!).

US-070415-02Here are some of the drawings finished and ready to be exposed onto screens ready for printing.  I use the Staedtler Pigment Liner 0.05 and the Copic Multi Liner 0.03 for drawing.  The Copic is the only one I have found in 0.03 and is brilliant as both nib and ink cartridge are easily replaceable (you get through a lot of nibs at this size).  However, the Staedtler is my favourite – I haven’t found a better disposable pen in 0.05mm (I think I’ve tried them all!) and now buy boxes of 20 at a time.

US-070415-03

Abirdabode in Oldham Library

(Astro) Turf's Up

As part of the Abirdabode Exhibition, myself and Richard Dawson couldn’t resist creating some of our own art bird boxes.  We got so carried away we couldn’t fit them all into the Gallery as part of the main exhibition so came up with a sneaky plan to install them into the library downstairs.

Having got the go ahead from Oldham Library, who were brilliant and completely open to our weird requests, we spent an afternoon installing the boxes on the shelves in the main library.  The ten boxes have now formed an art bird box trail amongst the books and the only clues to find them consist of Dewey Decimal numbers and subject headings.